fema

Be Prepared - Active Shooters

ActiveShooter_508_Page_1.png
ActiveShooter_508_Page_2.png

MORE DETAILS

This page describes what to do if you find yourself in an active shooting event, how to recognize signs of potential violence around you, and what to expect after an active shooting takes place.  Remember during an active shooting to RUN. HIDE. FIGHT.

Be Informed

  • Sign up for an active shooter training.

  • If you see something, say something to an authority right away.

  • Sign up to receive local emergency alerts and register your work and personal contact information with any work sponsored alert system.

  • Be aware of your environment and any possible dangers.

Make a Plan

  • Make a plan with your family, and ensure everyone knows what they would do, if confronted with an active shooter.

  • Look for the two nearest exits anywhere you go, and have an escape path in mind & identify places you could hide.

  • Understand the plans for individuals with disabilities or other access and functional needs.

During

RUN and escape, if possible.

  • Getting away from the shooter or shooters is the top priority.

  • Leave your belongings behind and get away.

  • Help others escape, if possible, but evacuate regardless of whether others agree to follow.

  • Warn and prevent individuals from entering an area where the active shooter may be.

  • Call 911 when you are safe, and describe shooter, location, and weapons.

HIDE, if escape is not possible.

  • Get out of the shooter’s view and stay very quiet.

  • Silence all electronic devices and make sure they won’t vibrate.

  • Lock and block doors, close blinds, and turn off lights.

  • Don’t hide in groups- spread out along walls or hide separately to make it more difficult for the shooter.

  • Try to communicate with police silently. Use text message or social media to tag your location, or put a sign in a window.

  • Stay in place until law enforcement gives you the all clear.

  • Your hiding place should be out of the shooter's view and provide protection if shots are fired in your direction.

FIGHT as an absolute last resort.

  • Commit to your actions and act as aggressively as possible against the shooter.

  • Recruit others to ambush the shooter with makeshift weapons like chairs, fire extinguishers, scissors, books, etc.

  • Be prepared to cause severe or lethal injury to the shooter.

  • Throw items and improvise weapons to distract and disarm the shooter.

After

  • Keep hands visible and empty.

  • Know that law enforcement’s first task is to end the incident, and they may have to pass injured along the way.

  • Officers may be armed with rifles, shotguns, and/or handguns and may use pepper spray or tear gas to control the situation.

  • Officers will shout commands and may push individuals to the ground for their safety.

  • Follow law enforcement instructions and evacuate in the direction they come from, unless otherwise instructed.

  • Take care of yourself first, and then you may be able to help the wounded before first responders arrive.

  • If the injured are in immediate danger, help get them to safety.

  • While you wait for first responders to arrive, provide first aid. Apply direct pressure to wounded areas and use tourniquets if you have been trained to do so.

  • Turn wounded people onto their sides if they are unconscious and keep them warm.

  • Consider seeking professional help for you and your family to cope with the long-term effects of the trauma.

National Preparedness Month - Make a Plan

National Preparedness Month

National Preparedness Month, is recognized each September to promote family and community disaster and emergency planning now and throughout the year.

Make A Plan

Make a plan today. Your family may not be together if a disaster strikes, so it is important to know which types of disasters could affect your area.  Know how you’ll contact one another and reconnect if separated. Establish a family meeting place that’s familiar and easy to find.

Step 1: Put together a plan by discussing these 4 questions with your family, friends, or household to start your emergency plan.

  1. How will I receive emergency alerts and warnings?

  2. What is my shelter plan?

  3. What is my evacuation route?

  4. What is my family/household communication plan?

Step 2:  Consider specific needs in your household.

As you prepare your plan tailor your plans and supplies to your specific daily living needs and responsibilities. Discuss your needs and responsibilities and how people in the network can assist each other with communication, care of children, business, pets, or specific needs like the operation of durable medical equipment. Create your own personal network for specific areas where you need assistance.  Keep in mind some these factors when developing your plan:

  • Different ages of members within your household

  • Responsibilities for assisting others

  • Locations frequented

  • Dietary needs

  • Medical needs including prescriptions and equipment

  • Disabilities or access and functional needs including devices and equipment

  • Languages spoken

  • Cultural and religious considerations

  • Pets or service animals

  • Households with school-aged children

Step 3: Fill out a Family Emergency Plan

Download and fill out a family emergency plan or use them as a guide to create your own.

Step 4: Practice your plan with your family/household

The Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (EFFAK)

Click image to go to eBook.

Click image to go to eBook.

If a disaster or other emergency strikes your community, you may only have seconds or minutes to react. In those critical moments, your focus will be on your family’s safety. Once the threat of harm has passed, having your homeowners or renters insurance policy, bank account information, and other household records and contacts will be very important as you begin the recovery process. The Emergency Financial First Aid Kit (EFFAK) can help you be ready.